International Applicant

Salary and Benefits

Salaries are based on the prevailing wage for registered nurses, as set by the United States Department of Labor. Our benefit package includes medical, dental and life insurance; a 401 (k) savings plan; professional liability insurance; travel and/ housing assistance; and other incentives that will be discussed when you sign your UNI contract.

The “Green Card” (Permanent Residency)

All nurses who come to America to work for UNI enter the U.S. with what is commonly called the “Green Card” (Permanent Residency). Also known as an Immigrant Visa, EB-3 or Third Preference, this allows you to work in the U.S. for as long as you like as a permanent resident of the United States.

Because of the large number of people who apply for a “Green Card” (Permanent Residency) the entire process takes about eight months to one year to complete.

The “Green Card” (Permanent Residency) is especially valuable for married applicants. UNI sponsors the nurse for a “Green Card” (Permanent Residency), but the nurse’s spouse and any unmarried children under the age of 21 will also be automatically be entitled to apply for a “Green Card” (Permanent Residency). All “Green Card” (Permanent Residency) holders are legally entitled to work in the USA.

For updated immigration information, please visit www.hammondlawgroup.com.

The Visa Process

To work in the U.S., all citizens of foreign countries must obtain a visa issued by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS).

While this can be a lengthy and complex process, United Nursing International works hard to make it as simple as possible for you. We will guide you through every stage of the process.

Step 1
Step 2
Step 3
Step 4

INS must approve an immigrant visa petition (Form I-140, Petition for Alien Worker) for the person wishing to immigrate to the United States. UNI acts as the sponsor (or petitioner) for the nurse (or beneficiary) who wants to live and work on a permanent basis in the United States.

Note: U.S. immigration law now requires that healthcare professionals, other than physicians, complete a screening program in order to qualify for certain occupational visas. VisaScreen,T a program offered by the International Commission on Healthcare Professions (ICHP, in association with CGFNS), enables healthcare professionals to meet this requirement by verifying and evaluating their credentials. This assures compliance with the government’s minimum eligibility standards.

The time period to receive the VisaScreenT certificate varies. UNI recommends that you complete an application as soon as your I-140, Petition for Alien Worker, has been filed with INS. You’ll need to present the certificate when you go for the final visa interview at the consulate, so having it in plenty of time before your interview will help relieve some of the stress you’ll naturally be feeling at that point!

See VisaScreen for more information and an on-line application request form.

Once the I-140 has been submitted to INS, approval can take three to six months or longer. UNI will notify you when we receive both the receipt and approval notice from the INS.

Several weeks after the I-140 has been approved, you’ll receive forms and instructions from the National Visa Center in New Hampshire. It is important that you respond immediately to this mailing. UNI will assist you with the completion of these final forms. Once the forms have been submitted to the consulate, you’ll receive instructions for obtaining the medical exams and fingerprinting that are required for working in the U.S.

The timelines for these steps can vary greatly from consulate to consulate.

Now you are waiting for the notice of your interview date!

The fourth and final step is the interview at the consulate. The American consulate in your country will contact you and ask you to come in for the interview. We will give you information on how this interview is usually conducted and will tell you what questions you can expect as well as what documents to take with you.

When you receive your visa, you are ready to come to the United States to begin you new assignment with UNI.

The timelines for these steps can vary greatly from consulate to consulate.

Now you are waiting for the notice of your interview date!

Immigrating to the USA

Once you have obtained your Green Card / Visa (Permanent Residency), you are then ready to immigrate to the U.S. to work for U.N.I

Most U.S. hospitals schedules vary for their nurses, depending on hospitals. Shifts vary between 8, 10 or 12 hour shifts. U.S. hospitals also have their own policies with regard to day, evening and night shifts, as well as weekend and holiday assignments. Weekend and holiday assignments are generally shared by all nurses.

Prior to your arrival in the US, U.N.I. will begin working with our client healthcare facilities to review their current openings. We will endeavor to match each nurse’s skills and assignment-length preference with the client staffing needs.

At U.N.I., we will provide you with detailed information on your hospital and surrounding area. You will be placed where your qualifications and assignment length meet the clients staffing needs.

When you arrive in the United States of America, a U.N.I. representative will be there to meet you. We will have already made arrangements for your transition to your new hospital and community. Your U.N.I. representative will also help you with various arrangements.

U.N.I. suggest that if you are married and have a family, that you come alone to the United States for the first six months of your assignment. This gives you time to settle in and get acquainted with your facility, as well as adjust to your new surroundings. This will equip you with the information needed to help spouses find employment as well as childcare and school enrollment. If you choose to bring your family with you, will be responsible for them.

We know that it can take some time for you to feel comfortable in your new surroundings. That’s why you will be assigned to a recruiter at United Nursing International as questions may arise..

In return for the expenses we pay and the assistance we offer you in coming to the U.S., we ask that you contract with us as an employee of UNI for three years (156 weeks).

Licensure

To work as a Registered Nurse in the United States, you must be licensed in the state in which you plan to practice. Initial licensure in a state is awarded by receiving a passing grade on the National Council License Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

Once you pass the NCLEX-RN and are licensed in a state, you may apply to other states through a process known as endorsement.

The NCLEX-RN
Africa, Asia, India,
Eartern European Countries
Australia, New Zealand,
United Kingdom
Canada

The NCLEX-RN

The NCLEX-RN is designed to make sure that each nurse has the knowledge to practice safely at a minimum of an entry-level registered nurse. The NCLEX-RN examination, administered via Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT), uses standard NCLEX-RN-examination, multiple-choice questions. With CAT, each candidate’s test is unique: It is assembled interactively as the individual is tested. As the candidate answers each question, the computer calculates a competence estimate based on all earlier answers. CAT provides greater measurement efficiency, because it administers only questions that will offer the best measurement of the candidate’s competence. For more information on the NCLEX-RN visit the National Council of State Boards Web site at www.ncsbn.org

UNI will assist in your preparation for the NCLEX-RN. When you are ready to take the NCLEX-RN, UNI will assist you in obtaining a tourist or business visa. You will then be scheduled for the NCLEX-RN exam.

NCLEX Test Locations:

United States or United States Territories like Guam or American Samoa.
For more information on NCLEX please contact:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
111 East Wacker Drive
Suite 2900
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Phone Number: (312) 525-3600
Fax Number: (312) 279-1032
www.ncsbn.org

There are a few basic requirements to working as a nurse in the United States.

  • A current health care professionals license in your home country
  • Two years of acute-care experience in specialties such as intensive care (either adult, pediatric or neo-natal), coronary care, medicine, surgery, emergency room, general theatres, recovery and obstetric health care professionals
  • Graduation from a 3-year general health care professionals program at an accredited school of health care professionals, must have THEORY and CLINICAL in:
    • Adult Surgical
    • Pediatrics
    • Maternity/Midwifery
    • Psychiatric
    • Community health care professionals should be included in the above.
  • Must qualify for U.S. Visa, e.g. no criminal record.
  • CGFNS exam
  • NCLEX exam
  • In addition, immigrant healthcare workers must demonstrate competence in oral and written English as shown by an appropriate score on one or more nationally recognized tests.

These tests are commercially available, standardized assessments of English language proficiency.

Foreign-educated nurses applying to the VisaScreen program must satisfy these requirements by choosing one of the following testing options:

  • Three-part test given by the Educational Testing Service (ETS):
    • TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)
    • TSE (Test of Spoken English)
    • TWE (Test of Written English)

If you meet the requirements above, the next step is to apply for the CGFNS exam. The CGFNS exam is mandatory. The CGFNS is a credential evaluation or certificate of a passing grade on the qualifying exam of the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS). For more information on CGFNS visit their website www.cgfns.org

When these requirements are met, we will help you move on to the visa process.

Nurses who have graduated from a health care professionals program in Australia, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand and the UK are exempt from this English language requirement.

For more information about taking the TOEFL, TWE and TSE exams, as well as international test sites please contact:

TOEFL/TSE Publications
Test of English as a Foreign Language
PO Box 6151
Princeton, NJ 08541-6151
Telephone 609-771-7100
www.toefl.org

For more information on CFGNS please contact:

CGFNS
3600 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2651
Telephone 215-349-8767
Fax 215-349-0026
Email: support@cgfns.org
www.cgfns.org

For more information on NCLEX please contact:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
111 East Wacker Drive
Suite 2900
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Phone Number: (312) 525-3600
Fax Number: (312) 279-1032
www.ncsbn.org

There are a few basic requirements to working as a nurse in the United States.

  • A current health care professionals license in your home country
  • Two years of acute-care experience in specialties such as intensive care (either adult, pediatric or neo-natal), coronary care, medicine, surgery, emergency room, general theatres, recovery and obstetric health care professionals
  • Graduation from a 3-year general health care professionals program at an accredited school of health care professionals, must have THEORY and CLINICAL in:
    • Adult Surgical
    • Pediatrics
    • Maternity/Midwifery
    • Psychiatric
    • Community health care professionals should be included in the above.
  • Must qualify for U.S. Visa, e.g. no criminal record.
  • CGFNS exam
  • NCLEX exam

If you meet the requirements above, the next step is to apply for the CGFNS exam. The CGFNS exam is mandatory and we can petition for you to take the exam while you are still in your home country. The CGFNS is a credential evaluation or certificate of a passing grade on the qualifying exam of the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS). For more information on CGFNS visit their website www.cgfns.org.

For more information on CFGNS please contact:

CGFNS
3600 Market Street, Suite 400
Philadelphia, PA 19104-2651
Telephone 215-349-8767
Fax 215-349-0026
Email: support@cgfns.org
www.cgfns.org

For more information on NCLEX please contact:

National Council of State Boards of Nursing, Inc.
111 East Wacker Drive
Suite 2900
Chicago, Illinois 60601
Phone Number: (312) 525-3600
Fax Number: (312) 279-1032
www.ncsbn.org

It is simpler than ever for UNI to place Canadian-trained Registered Nurses in a wide range of positions in the United States. All you need is the NCLEX exam a TN visa (Trade NAFTA). UNI will guide you through every step of the way.

To work as a nurse in the United States, there are a few basic requirements.

These are:

  • Graduation from a 3-year general health care professionals program at an accredited school of health care professionals, must have THEORY and CLINICAL in:
    • Adult Medical
    • Adult Surgical
    • Pediatrics
    • Maternity/Midwifery
    • Psychiatric
    • Community health care professionals should be included in the above.
  • A current health care professionals license in your home country
  • Two years of acute-care experience in specialties such as intensive care (either adult, pediatric or neo-natal), coronary care, medicine, surgery, emergency room, general theatres, recovery and obstetric health care professionals
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